7 Common Grammar Mistakes We All Need To Stop Making

Written by Neha Monga
September 27, 2017  

We all have been there and done that. We’ve all made those silly grammatical mistakes, that sounded just fine in our head, especially while writing a blog or a book maybe. But there are times when you don’t even realise that you made a mistake. What then? Well don’t you worry. Here we bring the most common grammatical mistakes that we all make.

These are the 7 of the most common grammatical mistakes that all of us make:

1.Your vs. You’re

‘Your’ indicates possessive form while ‘You’re’ is a contraction of you are. The basic difference between these two is owning something versus actually being something:

Is he your brother?

You’re a very good boy.

2. Than vs. Then

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The two words sound almost alike which is the reason why most people get confused. ‘Than’ is used to compare two things or sentences and ‘then’ is indicative of time and order of occurrence of events.

Samuel’s assignment was better than Sophie.

We picked her up and then went for a movie.

3. Effect vs. Affect

This is the most common mistake that people make. The difference between the two is ‘Effect’ is a noun and ‘Affect’ is a verb. An example will make it clearer.

The movie had a bad effect on children

The movie affected the children very badly.

4. Lose vs. Loose

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‘Lose’ is a verb that means “to be unable to find (something or someone), to fail to win (a game, contest, etc.), or to fail to keep or hold (something wanted or valued).” Whereas “Loose” is an adjective that means “not tightly fastened, attached or held.”

This is your fifth pen, please don’t lose this one.

Please wear a loose t-shirt for the yoga session tomorrow.

5. Their vs. There vs. They’re

‘Their’ refers to something owned by a group, ‘There’ refers to a place and ‘They’re’ is a contraction for “they are” .

Going to the beach was their idea.

Can you please sit there?

They’re going to a party tonite.

6. Peek vs. Peak

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This is another mistake that people often make. ‘Peek’ is taking a quick look at something and ‘Peak’ is a sharp point — like the peak of a mountain.

Tom opened the box and peeked inside.

At her peak she was writing a new novel every year.

7. A lot vs. Alot

Sorry to say but there is no word called ‘alot.’ If you’re trying to say that someone has a vast number of things, you’d say they have ‘a lot’ of things.

 

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